Category Archives: Haverford

Crime Blotter: September 18 - November 20 2016

The Crime Blotter: September 18, 2016 - November 20, 2016

September 18, 2016 to November 20, 2016

HAVHaverford College

Friday, September 30, 2016 through Thursday, October 6, 2016

Saturday, October 1st

12:06 am, Alcohol Related Illness, Harris Road

A Haverford student was transported by ambulance to Bryn Mawr Hospital for an alcohol related illness. The Graduate Assistant and Nurse on Call were notified.

1:41 am, Alcohol Related Illness, Stokes Hall

A Bryn Mawr student was transported by ambulance to Bryn Mawr Hospital for an alcohol related illness. Bryn Mawr Campus Safety was notified.

11:30 am, Theft, Off Campus

A student reported that his wallet was taken from a friend’s house while in Cecil County, Maryland. He was advised to report the theft to the local authorities in that area. 

7:43 pm, Suspicious Person, Harris Road        

A student reported a suspicious man on crutches in the area of Carter & Harris.  Campus Safety checked the area but the subject was not located.

 11:56 pm, Alcohol Related Illness, Founders Hall

A report was received of a Bryn Mawr College student suffering from an alcohol related illness at Founders Hall. The student was transported to Bryn Mawr Hospital by ambulance. BMC Campus Safety notified.

 

Tuesday, October 4th

12:28 pm, Unauthorized Activity, Dining Center

Two individuals were observed soliciting students for signatures for a petition. The individuals were located, left campus without incident.

 1:09 pm, Property Damage, Greenhouse

An unknown person struck a staff member’s personal vehicle which was parked near the greenhouse. No injuries reported; minor damage to the vehicle.

 

Wednesday, October 5th

1:55 am, Noise Complaint, Barclay Hall

A student reported noise from people skateboarding in the area of Barclay Hall. Students were located outside and advised of the complaint.

 

Friday, October 28th

10:31 am, Fire Alarm, INSC

A contractor working at Sharpless accidentally caused the Fire Alarm at the INSC.

12:52 pm, Personal Illness, Sharpless

A Contractor working at Sharpless had a medical emergency and was transported by ambulance to Bryn Mawr Hospital.

8:32 pm, Check On Well-Being, On Campus

Parent of a student contacted Campus Safety to check on well-being of his daughter. Student was located and advised to contact her father.

 11:38 pm, Personal Illness, HCA 10

Campus Safety and EMS responded to HCA 10 for a student having a panic attack. Student was permitted to remain on campus after being cleared by responding EMS.

 

Saturday, October 29th

1:45 am, Personal Illness, Barclay Hall

Officers responded to a report of an ill student. After speaking with the Nurse on Call the student will remain on campus.

5:35 am, Fire Alarm, HCA 23

Campus Safety responded to a fire alarm at HCA 23 that was caused by burnt food in a first floor apartment. The apartment was ventilated and the system was restored.

 2:28 pm, Check on Well-Being, On Campus

A Haverford professor was concerned about the well-being of a BMC student. BMC Campus Safety was notified and located the student.

9:08 pm, Property Damage, Visitor Parking Lot

A driver struck a parked vehicle as she was leaving her parking space. No injuries reported, minor damage to both vehicles.

 

Sunday, October 30th

12:43 am, Personal Illness, Gummere

Campus Safety responded to a report of a non-Haverford student suffering from an alcohol related illness in Gummere. Visitor transported to Bryn Mawr Hospital for treatment.

12:50 am, Personal Illness, Barclay

The Nurse on Call was contacted for a student having an alcohol related illness. Student was permitted to remain on campus, G.A. notified.

1:01 am, Personal Illness, Barclay

Student suffering from an alcohol related illness at Barclay Hall restroom. Campus Safety contacted the Nurse on Call, who permitted the student to remain on campus. G.A .notified.

3:44 am, Suspicious Circumstances, HCA 18

A student heard strange noises outside her apartment. Campus Safety responded and found nothing out of the ordinary.

12:29 pm, Theft from Building, Founders Hall

A decorative prop was removed from the Great Hall. No police report was filed by the owner.

7:46 pm, Property Damage, Lloyd Lot  

A tree fell on a staff member’s vehicle causing extensive damage.

 

Monday, October 31st

5:17 pm, Suspicious Activity, HCA 42

Campus Safety observed a person pulling himself up on a first floor window ledge.  Three people fled campus as officers approached.

5:42 pm, Theft from Building, Dining Center

A student reported his cell phone was taken after momentarily leaving it unattended. The student declined to file a police report.

5:46 pm, Theft from Vehicle, Walton Rd

Unknown person broke a visitor’s car window removing her purse as she walked on the Nature Trail. A police report was filed with the Haverford Township Police department.

6:10 pm, Fire Alarm, HCA 14

Fire alarm activation at HCA 14 was caused by a resident cooking in a first floor apartment. Area was ventilated and the system was restored.

 

Wednesday November 2nd    

5:48 pm, Check on Well-Being, On Campus

The Deans office requested that Campus Safety check on the well-being of a student. Student could not be located but the student contacted the Deans office the next day.

 8:46 pm, Fire Alarm, Gummere

The fire alarm at Gummere was caused by burnt food in a microwave on the third floor of section two. Area was ventilated and the system was restored.

10:46 pm, Fire Alarm, Gummere           

The alarm was caused by burnt popcorn in a microwave on the first floor of section three.

 

Thursday, November 3rd

12:35 am, Disturbance, MacIntosh Rd

Campus Safety observed skateboarders hanging onto passing vehicle. Skateboarders were identified as students.

10:04 pm, Medical Transport, Carter Road     

A BMC student was transported to Bryn Mawr Hospital for a foot injury. The injury did not occur at Haverford, BMC Campus Safety notified.

10:22 am, Fire Alarm, HCA 15    

The alarm was caused by a resident cooking in a second floor apartment. Area was ventilated and the system restored.

13:39 pm, Personal Injury, INSC

A student hit her head a wall after becoming ill. Student was transported to Health Services for evaluation.

 

There are no other significant incidents to report

 

BMC  

Bryn Mawr College

Monday, September 19 - Sunday, November 20 2016 

Monday, September 19th

10:14 am, Vehicle Booted, Erdman Lot

A vehicle was booted when it was found to have numerous unpaid parking citations.  The boot was removed upon payment of outstanding citations.

 

Tuesday, September 20th

6:41 am, Medical Transport, Denbigh Hall

A student was transported to Bryn Mawr College Emergency Room for evaluation and treatment.

1:22 pm, Damaged Property, Pond

Report received of damage to two college owned boats.  Damage occurred sometime after September, 2014.

5:33 pm, Medical Response, Schwartz Gym

A student was transported by Narberth ambulance to Bryn Mawr Hospital Emergency Room for evaluation and treatment.

 

Wednesday, September 21st

12:02 pm, Medical Transport, New Dorm

A member of staff was transported to Bryn Mawr Hospital Emergency Room for evaluation and treatment.

1:42 am, Assist Student, Bryn Mawr College

Officers provided assistance to a student in contacting an outside agency.

 

Saturday, September 24th

12:45 am, Medical Transport, Erdman Hall

A student was transported to Bryn Mawr Hospital Emergency Room and a nearby doctors’ office for evaluation and treatment.

7:31 am, Information Received, Pond

Officers responded to the Pond on the report of two individuals fishing.  The subjects were identified and left the area when requested to do so.

3:09 pm, Medical Transport, Denbigh Hall

A student was transported to Bryn Mawr Hospital Emergency Room for evaluation and treatment.

7:49 pm, Medical Transport, Denbigh Hall

A student was transported to Bryn Mawr Hospital Emergency Room for evaluation and treatment.

11:36 pm, Alcohol, Rockefeller Hall

A student was transported by Narberth Ambulance to Bryn Mawr Hospital Emergency Room for evaluation and treatment.

 

Monday, September 26th                              

6:50 am, Damaged Property, Campus Center

A Housekeeping staff member reports damage to the wall in a basement restroom.

9:58 am, Medical Transport, Park Science Building

A student was transported to the Health Center for evaluation and treatment.

 

Tuesday, September 27th

3:42 am, Medical Response, Enid Cook Center

A Campus Safety Officer responded to the Enid Cook Center on the report of an ill student.  The student, who refused transport to the hospital, was assisted by the Officer.

1:47 pm, Medical Transport, Enid Cook Center

A student was transported to the Health Center for evaluation and treatment.

2:53 pm, Information Received, Campus Mailroom

A student reports an item sent to her had gone missing from her campus mailbox.

 

Thursday, September 29th

8:44 pm, Veh. Acc./On Campus, Ward Building

A certified campus driver was involved in a vehicle accident when the college owned vehicle she was operating struck a fixed object near the Ward Building.

 

Saturday, October 1st

2:34 am, Intoxication, Haverford College

Haverford College Safety and Security Department notified Bryn Mawr College Campus Safety that a Bryn Mawr student had been transported from their campus by ambulance to Bryn Mawr Hospital.  The student was suffering from an alcohol related illness.

10:20 am, Medical Transport, Brecon Hall

An ill student was transported by Narberth Ambulance to Bryn Mawr Hospital for evaluation and treatment.

 

Sunday, October 2nd

12:47 am, Intoxication, Haverford College

Haverford College Safety and Security Department notified Bryn Mawr College Campus Safety that a Bryn Mawr student had been transported from their campus to Bryn Mawr Hospital.  The student was suffering from an alcohol related illness.

 3:01 pm, Medical Transport, New Dorm

A student was transported to Bryn Mawr Hospital for evaluation and treatment.

7:04 pm, Medical Response, New Dorm

Officers responded to New Dorm on the report of an ill student.  The student, who refused transport to the hospital, was assisted to her room and will be checked on by the Hall Advisor.

 

Wednesday, October 5th

1:35 pm, Medical Transport, Campus Center

A student was transported to the Health Center for evaluation and treatment.

 

Thursday, October 6th

12:17 am, Suspicious Circumstances, Rockefeller Hall

Officers responded to Rockefeller Hall on the report of noises coming from the ceiling.  A maintenance request was placed with Facilities Services.

4:52 am, Medical Transport, Rockefeller Hall

A student was transported to Bryn Mawr Hospital Emergency Room for evaluation and treatment.

11:20 pm, Medical Transport, Bryn Mawr College

A student was transported to Bryn Mawr Hospital Emergency Room for evaluation and treatment.

 

Friday, October 7th

9:33 am, Medical Transport, Erdman Hall

A staff member was transported to Bryn Mawr Hospital Emergency Room for evaluation and treatment.

 

Sunday, October 16th

4:23 am, Medical Transport, Rhoads Hall

A student was transported to Bryn Mawr Hospital Emergency Room for evaluation and treatment.

5:18 pm, Medical Transport, New Dorm

Officers responded to New Dorm on the report of an ill student.  The student refused transport to the hospital and will have a friend stay with her.

 

Wednesday, October 19th

4:41 pm, Veh.Acc/On Campus, Merion Lot

A certified campus driver was involved in a vehicle accident when the campus owned vehicle she was operating struck an occupied, parked vehicle.  No injuries; minor damage to parked vehicle.

9:25 pm, Medical Response, Erdman Hall

Campus Safety Officers responded to Erdman Hall on the report of an ill student.  The student was transported by Narberth Ambulance to Bryn Mawr Hospital Emergency Room for evaluation and treatment.

9:57 pm, Medical Transport, Rhoads Hall

A student was transported to Bryn Mawr Hospital Emergency Room for evaluation and treatment.

 

Thursday, October 20th

9:06 am, Well Being Check, Rhoads Hall

Officers responded to Rhoads Hall and conducted a well-being check on a resident student.  The student made contact with the concerned party.

11:44 am, Medical Response, Benham Gateway

An ill staff member was transported by Narberth Ambulance to Bryn Mawr Hospital Emergency Room for evaluation and treatment.

 

Friday, October 21st

9:51 pm, Medical Transport, Merion Hall

A resident student was transported to Bryn Mawr Hospital Emergency Room for evaluation and treatment.

 

Saturday, October 22nd

12:00 pm, Well Being Check, Bryn Mawr College

A Lower Merion Police Officer conducted a well-being check on a resident student.

10:07 pm, Intoxication, Rhoads Hall

Officers responded to Rhoads Hall on the report of an ill student.  The student, who was suffering from an alcohol related illness, was transported by Narberth Ambulance to Bryn Mawr Hospital Emergency Room for evaluation and treatment.

 

Sunday, October 23rd

8:46 pm, Assist Student, Campus Safety

A Campus Safety Officer provided a student with crutches for an earlier diagnosed injury.

 

Monday, October 24th

12:17 pm, Medical Transport, Health Center

A student was transported to Bryn Mawr Hospital for evaluation and treatment.

 

Thursday, October 27th

12:27 am, Medical Response, Park Science

Officers responded to an area near park Science on the report of a student needing assistance. The student did not want transport to the Health Center or Bryn Mawr Hospital.  She was transported to her residence hall.

10:05 am, Medical Response, Carpenter Library

A student was transported by Narberth Ambulance to Bryn Mawr Hospital Emergency Room for evaluation and treatment.

5:58 pm, Suspicious Circumstance, Pembroke Arch

Officers responded to Pembroke Arch on the report of a suspicious person.  The subject was identified as a person waiting for the Blue Bus.

7:21 pm, Information Received, Off Campus

A Bryn Mawr College student was transported by Narberth Ambulance to Bryn Mawr Hospital Emergency Room for evaluation and treatment.

 

Friday, October 28th

10:20 pm, Intoxication, Park Science

While on patrol, a Campus Safety Officer found an intoxicated, ill student.  The campus MERT (Medical Emergency Response Team) responded.  The student was transported by Narberth Ambulance to Bryn Mawr Hospital Emergency Room for evaluation and treatment.

11:40 pm, Intoxication, Radnor Hall

Officers and the MERT team responded to Radnor Hall on the report of an ill, intoxicated student.  The student was assessed and will be watched over by friends for the night.

11:55 pm, Intoxication/Medical Incident, Brecon Hall

Officers and the MERT team responded to Brecon Hall on the report of an intoxicated, ill student.  The student was assessed and will be watched over by friends for the night.

 

Saturday, October 29th

12:53 am, Intoxication, Radnor Hall

Officers and the MERT team responded to Radnor Hall on the report of an intoxicated student The student was assessed and will be watched by friends for the night.

1:45 am, Intoxication, New Dorm

Officers and the MERT team responded to New Dorm on the report of an intoxicated student.  The student was assessed and was transported by Narberth Ambulance to Bryn Mawr Hospital Emergency Room for evaluation and treatment.

 

Monday, October 31st

8:44 pm, Medical Transport, Radnor Hall

A student was transported to Bryn Mawr Hospital Emergency Room for evaluation and treatment.

 

Tuesday, November 1st

12:04 am, Medical Transport, Rockefeller Hall

A student was transported to Bryn Mawr Hospital Emergency Room for evaluation and treatment.

4:43 pm, Damaged Property, Batten House Lot

A student reports minor damage to her unoccupied, parked vehicle.

 

Wednesday, November 2nd

5:04 pm, Medical Response, Thomas Hall

Officers responded to Thomas Hall on the report of an injured student.  The student, who refused medical treatment, was assisted by a Campus Safety Officer to her residence hall.

 

Sunday, November 6th

8:49 pm, Medical Transport, Pembroke West

A student was transported to Bryn Mawr Hospital Emergency Room for evaluation and treatment.

10:25 pm, Check on Well-Being, Arnecliffe Studio

Officers responded to the Arnecliffe and conducted a well-being check.  Contact was made with the student; on-call GA notified.

 

Monday, November 7th

12:06 pm, Check on Well Being, Bryn Mawr College

Officers conducted a well-being check on a resident student.  Contact was made with the student who will contact the concerned party.

12:17 pm, Medical Response, Carpenter Library

An ill student was transported to the Health Center for evaluation and treatment.

 

Tuesday, November 8th

6:30 pm, Information Received, Rockefeller Hall

A resident student reports several items missing from her locked room.

 

Wednesday, November 9th

12:40 am, Medical Transport, Pembroke East

A student was transported to Bryn Mawr Hospital Emergency Room for evaluation and treatment.

11:59 pm, Information Received, Thomas Hall

Campus Safety was notified of a local news crew on campus for election results and making students feel uncomfortable.

5:10 pm, Medical Response, Dalton Hall

An ill student was transported by Narberth Ambulance to Bryn Mawr Hospital Emergency Room for evaluation and treatment.

9:14 pm, Medical Transport, Erdman Hall

A student was transported to Bryn Mawr Hospital Emergency Room for evaluation and treatment.

 

Thursday, November 10th

9:54 am, Veh. Acc./On Campus, Social Work Lot

A college owned vehicle, being dropped off by an employee of a repair company, struck a fixed object while the driver was parking the vehicle.  No injuries. No damage to vehicle; minimal damage to metal standard.

11:02 am, Medical Transport, Erdman Hall

A student was transported to Bryn Mawr Hospital Emergency Room for evaluation and treatment.

11:26 pm, Fire Alarm, Brecon Hall

Officers responded to Brecon Hall on the report of a fire alarm activation.  Investigation determined the activation was caused by burned food in a microwave.

 

Friday, November 11th

11:53 pm, Suspicious Odor, Pembroke East

Officers responded to Pembroke East on the report of an odor of marijuana.  Officers were not able to locate the source.

 

Saturday, November 12th

12:53 pm, Veh. Acc./Off Campus, Merion Ave.

An authorized college driver reports being involved in an accident when the occupied vehicle she was operating struck the side mirror of an on-coming vehicle.  No injuries; minor damage to both vehicles.  Insurance information exchanged by both parties.

1:55 pm, Medical Transport, New Dorm

A student was transported to Bryn Mawr Hospital Emergency Room for evaluation and treatment.

11:35 pm, Intoxication, Denbigh Hall

Officers responded to Denbigh Hall on the report of an ill student.  The student, suffering from an alcohol related illness, will be watched over by a friend.

 

Sunday, November 13th

12:35 am, Intoxication, Pembroke East

A student, suffering from an alcohol related illness, was transported by Narberth Ambulance to Bryn Mawr Hospital Emergency Room for evaluation and treatment.

12:57 am, Information Received, Bryn Mawr College

A student reports receiving disturbing messages from an acquaintance.

1:18 am, Intoxication,Pembroke East

Officers responded to Pembroke East on the report of an ill student.  The student, suffering from an alcohol related illness, was transported to Bryn Mawr Hospital Emergency Room for evaluation and treatment.

2:10 am, Intoxication, Pembroke East

Officers responded to Pembroke East on the report of an ill student.  The student, suffering from an alcohol related illness, will be watched over by a friend.

7:50 am, Damaged Property, Taylor Hall

A staff member reports graffiti written on a first floor bathroom.

 

Monday, November 14th

9:25 pm, Burglary, Bryn Mawr College

Actor(s) entered the Graduate Student Lounge by removing the window grate.  Nothing was taken.

2:02 pm, Check the Well-Being, Pembroke Hall

An ill student was transported to the Health Center for evaluation and treatment.

6:08 pm, Medical Response, Park Science                          

An ill student was transported to the Health Center for evaluation and treatment.

 

Tuesday, November 15th

1:14 am, Psychiatric Emergency, Batten House

A student was transported to Bryn Mawr Hospital Emergency Room for evaluation and treatment.

 

Friday, November 18th

1:09 pm, Medical Response, Park Science                          

An ill student was transported to the Health Center for evaluation and treatment.

 

Sunday, November 20th

5:10 pm, Medical Transport, Health Center

An ill student was transported to the Bryn Mawr Hospital Emergency Room for evaluation and treatment.

                         There were no other significant incidents to report

 

Eurydice: A Modern Take on the Classic Story of Orpheus

By Daisy Chen, Staff Writer

“Take a pamphlet and a rock.” — Wait. A rock?

I walked into an already almost full auditorium. The impressive array of props on stage included a wall of blue one gallon water jugs and a half-cut car.

Eurydice is a modernized version of an original Greek mythology. The play starts out introducing the two main characters, Eurydice and Orpheus, who fall in love and get married. Soon thereafter, Eurydice dies and goes to the underworld, where she reunites with her mother. Meanwhile, Orpheus mourns her death by playing sad music and writing her letters he hopes will reach her. Orpheus does end up traveling to the underworld to rescue Eurydice, but unlike in the original myth, this Eurydice is the one who causes Orpheus to look back, making futile his attempts to rescue her. In this version, Eurydice lost all her memories and Orpheus became a stranger to her, so she thought it best to not follow him back.

In the original mythology, as Orpheus and Eurydice reach the gates of hell, a suspicious Orpheus turns around to see if it was actually Eurydice following him. He fears that Hades, lord of the underworld, had deceived him by sending someone else.

Unlike most plays, this production of Euridice was, to some degree, interactive and full of surprises. The rock given to each audience member at the door entered turned out to be a ticket to the underworld, though it turned into something of a distraction as several people dropped their stone throughout the course of the play. The most surprising moment was the loud stomp that echoed through the auditorium when a light shined on Orpheus as he literally climbed down to the underworld from our seats on the bleachers with a rope. When they asked us to keep the aisles clear because the actors would be running through, this was the last thing I expected.

On the other hand, the entering of the Stones and Hades in a floater that says “sticks and stones” was quite humorous. The Stones spoke directly to the audience at one point, each in a different language, which was very interactive and drew our attention. Hades also made quite the entrance with music and some pick-up lines for Eurydice.

To me, the most interesting and creative aspect of the production was that all the props on the stage was unexpectedly resourceful. I was most captivated by the wall of water jugs. They used it to transfer the letters between Orpheus and Eurydice, but it was also the door to the underworld.

I did not expect this level of detail and sophistication in the design of the set. Even the water dispenser served a bigger purpose than I had originally thought: from using it in the beginning of the play as a setting for Eurydice to drink water, to letting water flow out to create a small pond for sound effects and place setting.

Although this modern adaptation has the same tragic end as the original tale, this version continues the story as Eurydice and her mother re-dip themselves in the river, putting them both into deep sleep just as Orpheus comes down to the underworld yet again to find his wife, only to suddenly forget all his memories.

Lights out.

I was disappointed that Eurydice and Orpheus did not get the happy ending I had hoped they would, but a tragic ending to a love story captured the beauty of the traditional legend.

I’m no critic, but for me Eurydice was worth watching. Besides, admission was free.

Beijing Opera Singer Yonghong Jia Performs at Haverford

By Charlie Lynn, Staff Writer

Kun and Beijing Opera singer Yonghong Jia visited Haverford’s campus on Wednesday to sing two short opera pieces and discuss the history and performance of Chinese operas. Jia performed portions of both The Peony Pavilion and The Drunken Beauty Yang after a brief talk on the numerous styles of Chinese opera and the years of practice necessary to perfect their performance.

Jia arrived in the United States from China in 1999 as part of New York’s Lincoln Center Festival’s production of The Peony Pavilion. From 1999 to 2003, Jia toured with the production around the world, visiting multiple countries  including Australia, Italy, Singapore, Australia and Denmark, to name a few.  Jia currently lives in New Jersey and continues to perform as well as educate people about Chinese culture and art.

“I am always interested in spreading the art of Beijing opera.” Jia said, “I was so thrilled to be able to talk about this art from today.”

During Jia’s talk, she gave examples of the four main characters in Beijing opera: sheng (male characters), dan (female characters), jing (male characters with painted faces) and chou (clown-like characters).  Each character has multiple sub-types. Jia explained that specific types of characters are assigned to performers at a young age. Different character types not only differ vocally, but they each have a specific way of moving on stage.

Jia also detailed the intensity of training for young performers of Chinese opera. Many begin studying at eight years old. Chinese opera, she said, soon becomes their main focus. Jia herself was a latecomer to the art form. She explained, “I didn’t start learning until I was 17. Firstly, because I had been a dancer when I was young, so that was my main focus. Also, I didn’t want to lose something in my education.” She joked that many of the schools in which Chinese opera is studied, “are like the army” in the intensity of their practice.

The first piece that Jia performed was from The Peony Pavilion. This year marks the 400th anniversary of the death of author of The Peony Pavilion, the Ming Dynasty era playwright Tang Xianzu. Haverford Professor Shizhe Huang compared the works of Tang with those of William Shakespeare.

“This year we are celebrating the 400th anniversary of the death of William Shakespeare and of Tang Xianzu, maybe China’s Shakespeare.” She characterized the performance of The Peony Pavilion by Jia as “part of this celebration.”

During a break for a costume change for Jia, audience members were invited on stage to try on some of the other Chinese opera costumes Jia had brought along with her. Pablo Teal HC‘20, who at one point was dressed in a bright gown and headpiece, complete with a sword, described the experience as fantastic.

As a third-year Chinese student, he explained that it had been highly recommended by his Chinese professor that he attend the event.

“I haven’t seen Chinese opera before, but I think it’s fantastic. It’s really cool. He added, “As someone who also studies music, the meter is so different. The approach is so different.”

Nicholas Banks (HC ’20) said he also enjoyed the performance. Banks was already familiar with Chinese opera, but, he said, “It was really great to learn more specific details about this art form. Obviously it’s something that’s not talked about that often. It’s just great to understand more about it.”

The Borromeo Quartet Showcases a New Side of the Old

By Chloe Lindeman, Co-Editor-in-Chief

You might expect a group that reads its music on sleek laptop computers to favor contemporary music over classical sonatas. And although the Borromeo Quartet featured the works of three classic composers in its concert at Haverford College on Friday, Nov. 11, the music was hardly business as usual.

Violinists Nicholas Kitchen and Kristopher Tong, violist Mai Motobuchi and cellist Yeesun Kim,  each having had experiences playing  with some of the world’s greatest musicians, came together on stage  for a night of Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven.

Of the three quartets performed, Haydn’s String Quartet No. 2 in F major was the most traditional. As the opening piece, it gave listeners a chance to acquaint themselves with the group. The first violin and cello carried the melody line, yet the whole group was actively engaged throughout. Kitchen and Tong were placed opposite each other, in a relatively uncommon arrangement for string quartets today, giving the audience a clear view of both violinists’ emotive body language as they played.

The group was not afraid of silence. Throughout the concert, they took full advantage of pauses in the music, refusing to rush forward into the next theme.

Mozart’s String Quartet No. 19 in C major, aptly named “Dissonance,” brought to light a side of the composer you’ve likely never heard. Although certain parts conformed more closely to the classical master’s style, there was always the promise of a deviation to unexpected material. Rather than shying away from these surprising moments, the Borromeo Quartet dug in and emphasized Mozart’s use of new ideas.

The final piece, Beethoven’s String Quartet No. 14 in C-sharp minor, had some forward-thinking themes of its own. From the first movement, a dark fugue, to the final, racing allegro, the Borromeo maintained the high intensity of the piece. The quartet was written just a year before Beethoven’s death and is considered one of his most mature works.

One of the group’s strengths lay in the skillful interplay between parts. Though trading of melodies was at times limited to the first violin and the cello, in other instances Beethoven made sure each of the instruments was on equal footing, and the Borromeo Quartet allowed each of its members to shine.

The group’s dynamic range was also striking. From fortissimos fortified by the excitement of the players, to pianissimos softer than most quartets would dare to play, the quartet ventured to the extremes, and the result was a treat for the audience.

Ask Me Another Features Trivia, Celebrities, Music – and Haverford Students

By Chloe Lindeman, Co-Editor-In-Chief

How often do you see the inventor of the Choco Taco and the comedian who voices Gene Belcher in Bob’s Burgers on the same stage within minutes of each other? If you were at the recording of NPR’s game show Ask Me Another on Friday, Nov. 4, you saw just that – and much, much more.

The show featured Host Ophira Eisenberg, In-House Musician Jonathan Coulton and Puzzle Guru Art Chung and included a variety of short wordplay- and- trivia-based quizzes. Haverford College students chosen to participate answered questions that ranged from naming breakfast cereals (with a twist) to guessing the beach item described by Coulton to the tune of DNCE’s “Cake by the Ocean.”

Though the show has been around since 2012, this episode was its first collegiate recording.

“Everybody in New York is ‘too cool for school,’” Coulton told The Bi-College News. He noted that it was nice to get out of the city and be reminded that the shows are not just live performances, but are also aired on national radio.

“It’s always really thrilling just to see that people come out and enjoy the show.”

And come out they did. An hour or so before the act began, a line was already forming in front of Marshall Auditorium.

It wasn’t just the contestants testing their smarts onstage. The hosts were up against a challenge of their own when they had to determine the identity of mystery guest Alan Drazen, inventor of the Choco Taco, by asking only yes or no questions. After they correctly guessed his identity, Drazen shared his experience with unlimited Choco Tacos for life and told the audience to look out for a new frozen treat, which will hit the aisles in 2018.

Minutes later, Eisenberg interviewed a second special guest: Eugene Mirman, the comedian who voices Gene in the television series Bob’s Burgers. He spoke about his latest album, a nine-volume work, which may not be exactly what you think. Although it includes stand-up comedy, Mirman emphasized that it also contains much more, like the sounds almost 200 orgasms and “over 45 minutes of crying.”

The experience was unlike that of most events at Haverford. Students see their fair share of comedy on campus, but the combination of trivia, interviews and music – not to mention the prospect of ending up on national radio – made this a unique experience.

There’s no telling if, or when, Haverford will get the chance to bring this kind of event to campus again. But, hey, at least we can look forward to that new ice cream novelty.

 

Peace, Justice and Human Rights Department Sponsors First “Ethics Lunch”

By Sophie Webb, Features Editor

On Tuesday, Nov. 1, Haverford College hosted the very first Ethics Lunch, located in the Pendle Hill Room at Haverford’s Dining Center.

The lunch brought together a small group of bi-co community members, including students, professors, and faculty. The focus for the inaugural gathering was “the ethics of service and volunteerism.” Haverford student María Padrón ’19 and Executive Director of the Center for Peace and Global Citizenship, Eric Hartman, led the discussion, both beginning with a brief commentary on their personal expertise and experience.

The Ethics Lunch is an initiative created by Adam Rosenblatt, professor and Coordinator for the Peace, Justice, and Human Rights Department at Haverford, that utilizes funds given to the college to “sponsor ethical engagement and leadership.” Rosenblatt explained that he was inspired to create the ethics lunch because he sees it as an opportunity for students and faculty to interact outside of the classroom environment. He believes that “there is not enough space for people to just talk to each other,” and through the ethics lunch, hopes to create a casual environment that will foster conversation.

Padrón spoke about her experiences during a ten-week summer internship at a residential care center in San Marcos, Nicaragua. She was quick to discuss some of the aspects of her internship that she felt were problematic, explaining that it took more than half of her time in Nicaragua before she felt like she knew the children and the community well enough to actually engage and be involved. She also talked about the more general difficulties of short-term volunteerism and how she sometimes felt unqualified to do anything useful.

Hartman followed Padrón and spoke more broadly about some of the issues that arise when students from elite and privileged colleges, such as Haverford, venture into the global community to do service or rights work. He explained the importance of helping students create opportunities in which they can engage with the world in the most effective and respectful ways possible.

After Padrón and Hartman spoke, the conversation was opened to the larger group, giving people the opportunity to ask questions and share their own experiences and reasons for attending the ethics lunch. The goal of the ethics lunch is for it to be a recurring event, so keep your eyes peeled for news of further gatherings.

November Madness: Preview of NCAA Men’s Soccer Regional

By Staff Writer Pat O’Shea

Who’s next? That is the very question that the Haverford men’s soccer team was asking after winning their second consecutive Centennial Conference title last Sunday.

Their question was answered this past Monday when the NCAA Division III Men’s Soccer Tournament field of 64 teams was announced. Haverford was named a host for the fegional round for the second year in a row. Haverford will play against the US Merchant Marine Academy on Saturday at 11AM, and, if they win, will play the winner of the other game, UMass-Boston vs. Kean.

While the men’s soccer team was given the answer to who they are set to play, you may be wondering about the teams they have drawn in their regional. Let’s take a look at the other three teams in the regional and who I predict will come out on top this weekend.

 

In the first game, the Fords will face the Merchant Marine Mariners, hailing from the Skyline Conference. The Mariners finished 13-3-3 and 10-1 in their conference this season. Senior forward Gavin Yingling, who scored 20 goals on the season, and junior Jon Tarbox, who compiled 13 assists, led the team this season. The Haverford defense will undergo the tough task of containing these two when the teams square off on Saturday morning at 11AM.

Prediction: Haverford 2, USMMA 0. The Haverford defense has proved to be tough enough to stifle excellent offensive teams all season. Expect to see the Haverford offense come through in some big moments on Saturday.

 

In the second game on Saturday, the UMass-Boston Beacons, of the Little East Conference, face off against the Kean Cougars, who received an at-large bid out of the New Jersey Athletic Conference. UMass-Boston is currently ranked #15 in the nation, two spots behind #13 Haverford, and went 17-1-2 this season. Their lone loss this season was early on to Western Connecticut State, and they have since been on a tear. Look for UMass-Boston to attack Kean (14-5-1) early and often, led by the combination of Sophomore Mohamed Kenawy (16 goals) and Freshman Ocane Williamson (17 goals).

Prediction: UMass-Boston 4, Kean 1. The explosive offense of UMass-Boston will ultimately be too much for Kean to contend with.

 

If these predictions of Saturday’s action are true, Sunday’s match-up will be an incredible contest between #13 Haverford and #15 UMass-Boston. While UMass-Boston has demonstrated their offensive firepower, they have not been tested by the likes of the Fords. UMass-Boston has not played any ranked teams this season, while the Fords have played three ranked teams throughout the year. This potential regional championship game looks to be a fun game to watch with two elite offenses going head to head.

Prediction: Haverford 5, UMass-Boston 4 OT. There is a reason that UMass-Boston is ranked #15 in the nation, but ultimately I believe that Haverford has too much depth for the Beacons to overcome. Expect a high scoring affair at Historic Walton Field, which will not be decided within the 90 minutes of regulation.

 

Whichever team ends the weekend with two wins will then face the winner of the Rowan regional, consisting of Rowan, Lehman, Tufts, and Springfield.

Photos by Ethan Lyne

Get Out and Vote

By Chloe Lindeman, Co-Editor-in-Chief

In case you haven’t heard, it’s election season. For most students on campus, this will be the first opportunity to cast a ballot for the next president of the United States of America. But will they do it?

Historically, the Tri-College has had a less-than-stellar voting record. In the last presidential election, only 35% of Swarthmore students voted. According to Haverford College President Kim Benston, low student turnout is the result of a number of factors, including a general lack of understanding as to how important each student’s vote will be.

“As you get older, … and you start to realize your relationship to the taxation system, your relationship to the public infrastructure … you get a keener sense of how the political world affects that,” Benston told The Bi-College News.

At the same time, there are physical obstacles outside of students’ control.

“Students… have had their voting rights suppressed, to some extent,” Benston added. “Now, there’s as many of you as in my neighborhood, but I have a polling place that I can walk to and you don’t, so what’s that about? To me, that’s a political problem … It has not been made as easy for students, actually, as it could be.”

This year, however, there’s no excuse. Special Assistant to the President Franklyn Cantor has been organizing nonstop to ensure students can make it to the polls.

“The last two [voting] cycles have relied pretty heavily on students to get folks to the polls,” said Cantor. But this year, faculty and staff will be driving to ensure a constant flow of transportation, making the trip as convenient as possible.

“It’s a five-minute ride to the polls,” Cantor stressed. “We’re going to make sure folks have a chance to get there … I hope that we’ll have improved turn out, I really do.”

He’s not the only one interested in seeing an increased student turnout.

“I will be very interested to see what happens in this election,” said Benston. “This is honestly the most consequential election I’ve ever lived through. So if Haverford students don’t vote, I’ll be very, very saddened by that … It’s your world that’s going to be affected.”

It’s not just administrators who are working to get the vote out. Students have been tabling in Haverford’s Dining Center for weeks to register voters, and there have been a number of efforts to increase awareness throughout the election season.

Now that the campaigns are finally coming to a close, the only thing left to do is cast your ballot!

Astrophysicist Andrew Skemer Brings Distant Planets Close to Home

By Chloe Lindeman, Co-Editor-in-Chief

The question of whether life exists on other planets is one of the most fundamental questions humans ask. It is also one of the most difficult to answer.

This week, Swarthmore College alumnus and Astrophysicist at the University of California Santa Cruz Andrew Skemer came to Haverford’s campus for a talk and informal lunch, both revolving around his research on exoplanets, or planets that orbit stars other than our sun. The first was found in 1995; as of now, more than 3000 have been detected.

“When I started grad school, there was like one exoplanet paper a week, and now there are like 10 a day,” said Skemer. “It’s a really exciting 10 to 20 years coming up in exoplanet imaging.”

Skemer’s work relies on something called adaptive optics, which take earth’s atmosphere into account to improve images coming from telescopes. In addition to teaching us about our own solar system, studying exoplanets lets us answer questions about the wider universe, including how common these orbiting bodies are.

“Planets around stars are ubiquitous. They’re everywhere,” said Skemer. This includes our nearest neighbors – earlier this year, neighboring star Proxima Centauri was found to have a planet orbiting it in its so-called ‘habitable zone.’ Exoplanet imaging and other detection methods promise to give us more information.

“In the next 20 years, we’ll have a spectrum of [Proxima b] and we’ll know if there’s oxygen and methane on it,” said Skemer, noting two atmospheric gases whose presence may be one indicator of life.

Arjun Khandelwal (HC ’17), a physics and astronomy double major who does exoplanet research of his own, highlighted the importance of Skemer’s work and studying exoplanets in general.

“[Exoplanets] help us answer one of the grandest questions in the world: whether we are alone in the great enveloping cosmic dark,” said Khandelwal. “Most exoplanet work focuses on finding them in indirect ways because imaging them is really hard, but adaptive optics … is a wonderful technique to actually get pictures of alien worlds. It’s amazing that we have the ability to do that!”

Alien life or no, exoplanets promise to be important in the future of astronomy. Skemer pointed out that, when it comes to some areas of astronomy, like stars, we have answered most of the basic questions. We can observe a star and determine things like its mass, age and composition.

“With exoplanets, I promise you, we’ve answered almost none of the questions.” And that, Skemer says, is exactly what makes this such an exciting field.

For now, we can’t say much about the possibility of life on even the planets around the closest stars, but stay tuned.

“The next two or three decades will be the first time in human history that we’ll be able to detect life on other planets, if there is any,” said Khandelwal. “I was always fascinated by that question growing up, and it’s absolutely incredible to me that it might be answered in just the next couple of decades.”

Clinton Comes to Philadelphia

By Staff Writer Charlie Lynn

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and running mate Tim Kaine held a rally at a chilly Dunning-Cohen Champions Field, at Penn Park on Saturday, Oct. 22. Numerous Haverford College students took advantage of the opportunity to experience the campaign in person.

Sophie Frank ’19 and Magdalena Yeakey ’19 said they had initially planned to attend an earlier event for Hillary Clinton at the Haverford Community Recreation Center, but were unable to attend due to classes. Rebecca Hickey ’19 added, “I just wanted to see her.”

Frank’s attendance at the rally was not her first interaction with 2016 presidential campaign.

“Earlier this year, I protested at a Donald Trump rally in Albuquerque, New Mexico with some other Haverford students,” said Frank. “But, I really wanted the experience of participating not in opposition to something.”

Despite the huge numbers of people, most Haverford students said they did not wait in line for more than hour. The Clinton campaign estimate that around 7,750 people attended the rally.

Ali Corcoran ’19, who is involved on campus with the group No-Labels registering Haverford students to vote, explained that she was incredibly excited to be voting and participating in the process. She offered that, “I’ve loved watching the debate from the sidelines, but I really wanted to experience a campaign event.”

Yeakey noted before the debate that she was hoping to hear something more upbeat than much of the current political rhetoric.

“I look forward to hearing a different tone from the debate,” she said. “I’m looking for positions of positivity.”

Photo Credit: Ethan Lyne
Photo Credit: Ethan Lyne

Before the arrival of Clinton and Kaine to the stage, State Representative Dwight Evans, a candidate for Pennsylvania’s Second Congressional District, Josh Shapiro, a candidate for Pennsylvania Attorney General, Pennsylvania Senator Bob Casey, and Senate candidate Katie McGinty spoke to the crowd.

Although Clinton’s consistent and significant lead in Pennsylvania polls has seemingly pushed any hope of Donald Trump victory in the state out of sight, the race between incumbent Republican Senator Pat Toomey and Democratic challenger Katie McGinty is significantly tighter. All of the night’s speakers, including Clinton and Kaine, worked to connect Toomey with his party’s nominee’s controversial statements. Democrats view a victory in the Pennsylvania race as key to retaking the Senate from Republicans in November.

McGinty explained the importance of removing Senator Toomey from office in order to enact the agenda of Hillary Clinton, telling the crowd, “Our mission is urgent”. Throughout her remarks, McGinty relentlessly attacked her opponent and connected him with Trump. She told an energetic crowd, “What does Pat Toomey need to hear? You failed!” She continued to point out that Toomey’s failure to fully back away from Donald Trump mean that he could no longer be trusted to represent Pennsylvanians. McGinty maintained that, “Pat Toomey has failed the test of leadership. He has failed the test of political courage.”

After a brief break, shortly before 9 p.m., Kaine and Clinton took the stage to raucous applause. Kaine introduced his running mate and explained the importance of Pennsylvania voters participating in the election offering. “If we win Pennsylvania,” he said, “this race will be over. We need your help. If we win here, you can guarantee it.”

As well as taking the opportunity to remind Pennsylvanian voters of the importance of voting and highlighting the qualifications and policies of Clinton and McGinity, Kaine repeatedly attacked Trump, asking the crowd, “Has Donald Trump even read the United States Constitution?” He added, “You all would know a bit about that here in Philadelphia.”

Kaine also emphasized many of Trump’s controversial statements. Discussing Trump’s comments about Clinton not having “the look” of a president, Kaine explained of his running mate, “I think she looks damn presidential.” He continued that, “Hillary has heard from people her whole life that this might not be the time, and she has never let that stop her.”

During Clinton’s portion she continued to urge Pennsylvanians “to spend the last seventeen days doing everything to send Katie to the Senate.” She also attacked Toomey, questioning whether he would be able to stand up to special interests given that he seems unable to stand up against Donald Trump’s more controversial remarks.

Clinton continually attacked her opponent on his business career, joking to the crowd about Trump’s losses from his casinos, “I don’t know how smart it is, losing a billion dollars on a casino. I thought the house always won.” She also questioned whether Trump’s claims that he may not accept the result of election disqualified him from being president. She offered that, “We’ve always had a peaceful transfer of power in the United States. We’ve always had democracy over dictatorship, rule of law over a strongman. The United States is bigger than Donald Trump.”

She even joked to supporters who might know people considering voting for Donald Trump, “You know, it’s not too late to stage an intervention. Friends don’t let friends vote for Donald Trump”

Listing a variety of issues from immigration and criminal justice reform to college affordability, Clinton stressed the significance of the participating in this election. She added, “This is a crossroad election. There could not be two different agendas and visions than between me and Donald Trump.”

Ending her speech, she told the crowd, “You’d better vote. Think about the future we want, think about the future we can create and remember love trumps hate.”

Haverford students were overwhelming enthusiastic about the evening. As she left the event, Corcoran said simply, “It was just amazing.”